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Gas prices are on the rise. Here are some ways to save a little bit of money.

The surge in gas prices swooped in just in time to dampen the mood in 2022. With the Russian invasion of Ukraine continuing to impact oil prices all around the world, the best solution might be to embrace the climb and start brainstorming some small life changes we can make to compensate.

According to AAA, the United States hit its highest average price per gallon Mar. 11 at $4.33 [1]. By adjusting, it’s possible to save hundreds, or even thousands, each month [2], and that money could go right back into your pocket. Fewer trips to the pump mean more money in your wallet, which means more money that you can spend, save or invest in your future. Here are seven tips to save money on gas as the prices rise:

  1. Use public transportation

This option might depend upon your geographic location and living situation, but you may be able to save on gas by taking public transportation. It may not be an option in widely-sprawling metro areas or cities without public transportation systems, but in major cities like New York, San Francisco, Boston, Philadelphia or Seattle, one household could save $10,000 or more each year by opting to use public transit [2]. That total could depend upon other factors, like the type of car you drive, insurance and parking, but gas and rising prices certainly figure into your possible savings.

  1. Start carpooling

For those who have longer work commutes or don’t live in cities with public transit systems, carpooling can be a great option. By finding a work friend who lives nearby and makes a similar commute, you might be able to cut your gas expenditure in half. Those savings can multiply if you decide to invite more people into your car pool, and it might even be a great option for those looking for more social outlets. Carpooling can also help the environment by reducing emissions, and it saves you time by cutting traffic and giving you access to the glorious high occupancy vehicle lane.

  1. Download price-viewing apps

Gas prices fluctuate based on location and company. Don’t you hate it when you get gas, then drive one mile down the road and see prices 30 cents cheaper than the price you just paid? Luckily, there is an easy fix for that problem. Phone apps, like GasBuddy [3], list prices for nearly every filling station in your immediate area. Users update the information to ensure that the prices you see are accurate, and you can pinpoint the cheapest gas with just a few taps. Simply checking nearby gas prices or rates in a specific city or zip code is free, but GasBuddy also offers premium, fee-based options that can help users rack up even more savings.

  1. Become a member of wholesale stores

Wholesale stores, like Costco, may feature lower gas prices depending on your area. Granted, a membership to Costco might cost you $60 annually [4], but we can do some quick math to see just how that membership fee has the potential to pay for itself. Prior to the pandemic, the average American filled their gas tank roughly once per week [5]. According to GasBuddy searches, in large metro areas like Los Angeles, Costco’s average price per gallon might be somewhere between 25 cents and 50 cents per gallon less than the average price in the area [6]. If you fill up your 12-gallon tank once per week, the lower end of the scale results in a savings of $3 per full tank. That may not sound like much, but for one person, the $60 annual membership fee is covered in 20 weeks, or less than half a year. Furthermore, Costco’s most basic package, the Gold Star membership, includes a second membership at no additional cost for someone over the age of 18 living in your household. Let’s say, for example, your spouse also fills their 12-gallon tank once per week. The membership would be paid for in just 10 weeks, and you could still get cheaper gas for the rest of the year.

  1. Work from home

This isn’t an option for everyone, but it’s no secret that the best way to save gas is by simply not using it. According to the Pew Research Center, 59% of workers in the United States who are able to work from home are taking advantage of that opportunity [7]. The reevaluation of work circumstances truly kicked into gear during the pandemic, but even as the spread of the virus wanes, it can be a great option for those still looking to cut down costs at the gas station.

  1. Pay cash

Not all gas stations offer savings for paying with cash, but some do. In our transition to a cashless world, you might not carry cash as often as you used to, but a quick stop at your local ATM on your way to fill up might prove to be beneficial. Apps like GasBuddy may be able to show whether or not a gas station provides a discounted rate for customers who pay with cash [8]. Another easy way to tell if a station takes cash is if a sign clearly states that the rate per gallon is for cash payments. Some stations even have signs that flash between two prices, showing the price per gallon for payments with card versus the price per gallon for payments with cash.

  1. Find alternatives to long-distance hobbies

We would never advise that you give up your hobbies, but if you’re concerned about surging gas prices, staying home can be a good option. Weekend vacations or one-day getaways can easily be turned into staycations, and in 2022, there are so many great options for at-home activities. You can rent a recent movie, listen to music, play board games, grill out, invite friends over for a gathering, work out or play with your pets. The pandemic also opened the door for events like virtual happy hours and video hangouts, so if you just can’t reach your friends and family because of distance, you can still see them and interact with them extremely easily, all without spending a nickel on fuel.

If you have any questions about this article or how to protect your retirement plan during times of high inflation, please give us a call! You can reach Drew Financial Private Capital in Tampa, Florida by calling (813) 820-0069.

 

These are the views of the author, not the named Representative or Advisory Services Network, LLC, and should not be construed as investment advice. Neither the named Representative nor Advisory Services Network, LLC gives tax or legal advice. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. Please consult your Financial Advisor for further information.

This site may contain links to articles or other information that may be contained on a third-party website. Advisory Services Network, LLC is not responsible for and does not control, adopt, or endorse any content contained on any third party website.

 

Sources

  1. https://gasprices.aaa.com/
  2. https://www.moneycrashers.com/benefits-public-transportation-travel-for-less/
  3. https://www.gasbuddy.com/home
  4. https://www.costco.com/join-costco.html
  5. https://www.reviews.com/insurance/car/drivers-fueling-behavior-after-covid/#:~:text=Over%2082%25%20of%20US%20drivers,decrease%20in%20consumer%20gas%20purchases
  6. https://www.gasbuddy.com/home?search=los%20angeles&fuel=1&brandId=38&maxAge=0&method=all
  7. https://www.pewresearch.org/social-trends/2022/02/16/covid-19-pandemic-continues-to-reshape-work-in-america/
  8. https://www.tmj4.com/news/local-news/if-discount-is-offered-using-cash-and-not-plastic-can-help-you-save-at-the-pump